Boeing Starliner 1st astronaut flight: Live updates

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2024-06-28T17:02:54.266Z

NASA, Boeing to talk to reporters at 2 p.m. EDT about Starliner

NASA and Boeing will discuss their next plans and a possible landing schedule for the first Starliner spacecraft mission with astronauts later today (June 28), and you can listen in live.

Boeing Starliner launched on June 5 for what was supposed to be a 10-day mission, but the test effort with astronauts needed extra time to address helium leaks and thruster issues uncovered during the June 6 docking with the International Space Station (ISS). The team will provide an update to reporters at 2 p.m. EDT (1800 GMT), which you can listen to here on Space.com via NASA Television. 

NASA will also provide an update on an unexpectedly busy week at ISS. One astronaut had a spacesuit coolant leak during a spacewalk on June 24 that required halting the planned 6.5-hour excursion after only 31 minutes. (The crew was never in any major danger, NASA said at the time.) The Expedition 71 crew also temporarily took shelter in their return spacecraft June 26 after a satellite broke up in low Earth orbit, although the precautionary procedure lasted only an hour.

Read more: Listen live today as NASA, Boeing discuss Starliner return, spacewalk issues

2024-06-24T12:11:52.054Z

Will 1st 6-month Starliner ISS mission be delayed after Crew Flight Test finishes?

Boeing’s Starliner capsule was delayed again Friday (June 21) in finishing its first International Space Station (ISS) mission with astronauts, with crew including NASA’s Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams. 

Extra testing still remains ahead of undocking, team officials emphasized; Starliner experienced helium leaks and thruster issues that extended its Crew Flight Test (CFT) mission from an originally planned 10 days after launching June 5. NASA and Boeing have not yet announced a return date for Starliner, saying only it will happen after a July 2 spacewalk.

As a test flight, the unexpected on CFT was in a sense, expected. But there’s a key milestone coming up fast: Starliner was expected to start its first operational mission to the ISS in early 2025. Known as Starliner-1, it is manifested to carry at least three astronauts to the ISS for a normal six-month mission.

Related: Will Boeing Starliner issues delay its 1st long-duration astronaut flight? It’s too soon to tell.

2024-06-18T16:09:26.129Z

Starliner landing delayed to June 26

Boeing and NASA have decided to delay the planned landing of its first Starliner astronaut test flight to no earlier than Wednesday, June 26, to allow “a little more time to look at the data” due to helium leaks and thruster issues on the spacecraft. 

Starliner is now targeted to land at White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico at 4:51 a.m. EDT (0951 GMT) on June 26, NASA officials said. 

NASA and Boeing are holding a press conference now on Boeing’s Starliner mission. You can listen live here: 

2024-06-18T12:10:12.839Z

Starliner’s delayed departure will be discussed in livestream today

NASA will talk about the delayed return to Earth of Boeing’s Starliner capsule during a press conference today (June 18), and you can listen to it live.

NASA and Boeing representatives will discuss the progress of Starliner‘s mission at the International Space Station (ISS), which docked June 6 after experiencing several helium leaks and issues with five onboard reaction control system (RCS) thrusters. 

The press conference begins at 12 p.m. EDT (1700 GMT) and you can listen to it live here at Space.com, via NASA Television.

Read more: NASA and Boeing will discuss Starliner’s delayed ISS departure today, and you can listen live

2024-06-14T13:13:28.687Z

Starliner CFT return now NET June 22

The departure of Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft from the space station, with NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams aboard, has been pushed back four more days, NASA announced Friday morning (June 14), in a blog post. Starliner’s Crew Flight Test (CFT) is now set to return no earlier than (NET) June 22. The extra time, according to NASA, will allow mission teams to finalize departure details and continue to test the on-orbit capabilities of the spacecraft.

In the interim, CFT crew members Wilmore and Williams will perform additional checks on Starliner, including a “hot-fire” test of seven of the spacecraft’s eight aft thrusters, hatch operations and “safe haven” drills to utilize Starliner in an emergency. NASA will hold a briefing Tuesday, June 18, to elaborate on Starliner’s delay, flight status and landing details.

2024-06-12T15:11:21.057Z

NASA keeping an eye on Starliner’s helium leaks

As NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams continue to run through planned systems checks of their Starliner spacecraft, the space agency is keeping a watchful eye on the capsule’s helium leaks. One leak was detected before launch, but deemed minor enough to proceed with the mission. Now, since its time in space, Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft has sprung four more helium leaks, though they have also been deemed not to pose a risk to the crew or spacecraft through its return window June 18. “Engineers evaluated the helium supply based on current leak rates and determined that Starliner has plenty of margin to support the return trip from station,” NASA officials wrote in a CFT update on Monday (June 10). 

Related: NASA weighs potential impacts of helium leaks and more on Boeing’s Starliner astronaut test flight

2024-06-10T17:06:01.736Z

Starliner’s 1st flight extended to June 18

Boeing’s Starliner capsule approaches the International Space Station for docking on June 6, 2024. (Image credit: NASA)

The first crew flight test of the Boeing Starliner spacecraft will last a little longer than planned.

Starliner is currently docked at the International Space Station (ISS) while its crew, NASA astronauts Suni Williams and Butch Wilmore, are spending a week aboard the orbital lab testing out the new spacecraft and conducting scientific research in microgravity. A spacewalk planned for June 13 being performed by a different crew aboard the ISS would have overlapped with Starliner’s originally scheduled departure time, so NASA has decided to push the mission’s ISS departure to June 18.

“The additional time in orbit will allow the crew to perform a spacewalk on Thursday, June 13, while engineers complete #Starliner systems checkouts,” NASA ISS officials said on Sunday (June 9) via X.

Read more: Boeing’s 1st Starliner astronaut mission extended through June 18

2024-06-07T18:45:25.201Z

Starliner astronauts spend 1st day aboard ISS

ISS Expedition 71 crew members pose with Suni Williams and Butch Wilmore after their arrival aboard Starliner.  (Image credit: NASA TV)

NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams are starting their first full docked day at the International Space Station. 

Among their tasks today is to unpack a new urine processing pump for a replacement, NASA officials said. The urine processor was a late addition to Starliner’s cargo manifest after the unit on the space station failed earlier this month.

Wilmore and Williams will spend about eight days putting Starliner through a series of tests to help certify it for operational crew missions. “We’re looking forward to staying here for a couple of weeks and getting all the things that we need to get done,” Wilmore said during a welcome ceremony after Starliner’s arrival on June 6.

Related: The ISS has a urine pump problem. Boeing’s Starliner astronaut launch will flush it out.

2024-06-06T19:55:12.569Z

Starliner hatch opens, crew welcomed aboard ISS

About two hours following their successful docking, NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams were given the ‘go’ to open Starliner’s hatch and enter the International Space Station. Wilmore and Suni opened the hatch from inside Starliner, and after some work to stow the spacecraft’s hatch for egress, entered the ISS and were greeted by the ringing of a bell by the station’s current crew as all seven members of Expedition 71 at 3:45 p.m. EDT (1945 GMT).

2024-06-06T17:36:46.219Z

Starliner docks with International Space Station

Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft has docked to the International Space Station with NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams. Soft capture occurred at 1:34 p.m. EDT (1734 GMT) with the forward  docking port of space station’s Harmony module. Starliner performed the docking autonomously. “At 12:34pm, Central time above the Indian Ocean, we have confirmation of contact and capture of NASA’s Boeing Crew Flight Test and Starliner aboard the International Space Station. Butch and Suni, have made their arrival,” NASA commentators said on the space agency’s live stream. A series of docking procedures will now take place as movement between Starliner and the space station dissipates. Starliner’s hatch is expected to occur in about an hour, with a short welcome ceremony from the current ISS crew.

2024-06-06T17:11:23.675Z

Starliner moving ahead to dock

After a test fire of some of Starliner’s reaction control system thrusters (RCS), NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams are now moving toward the forward docking port of the space station’s Harmony module. The spacecraft’s original docking attempt was waved off after an anomaly in those thrusters was detected, and after troubleshooting, it was determined to be safe to proceed with docking. Starliner is currently being operated autonomously, and will remain in that configuration through docking.

2024-06-06T16:15:33.150Z

Starliner astronauts wave first docking attempt

NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams have waved off the first docking attempt of their Starliner spacecraft with the Internationals Space Station, due to an anomaly with at least two of the spacecraft service module’s reaction control thrusters. The earliest scheduled docking was set for 12:15 p.m. EDT (1615 GMT), but that window is no longer available. The next available window begins at 1:33 EDT (1733 GMT). As Starliner remains in a ‘hold’ position, station-keeping with the ISS at about 200 meters distance, the astronauts continue to fly the spacecraft in manual mode, before switching to an automated maneuvering system ahead of docking procedures.   

Related: Boeing Starliner astronauts wave off 1st ISS docking attempt amid thruster issues

2024-06-06T16:08:39.403Z

Starliner docking on hold

Starliner is currently station-keeping with the ISS at a distance of about 200 meters away. They do not currently have the ‘go’ to enter the space station’s ‘keep-out sphere’ and proceed with the docking process, as they troubleshoot an issue with the spacecraft’s reaction control system thrusters on the service module, which experienced an anomaly during the manual fly-around maneuver.

2024-06-06T14:21:42.324Z

Starliner approaches ISS

Flying autonomously, Starliner is completing a series of burns to reach the ellipsoid of the International Space Station (ISS) for proximity operations. This boundary is a four kilometer by two kilometer by a two kilometer invisible sphere around the ISS, which acts as a safety buffer for all incoming and departing spacecraft.

Once the spacecraft has executed an approach corridor initiation burn, it will hold at around 850 feet (260 meters) away from the space station for manual piloting demo. Following, docking is scheduled for 12:15 p.m. EDT (1615 GMT), at the station’s forward-facing node-2 docking port.

2024-06-06T12:00:20.896Z

Starliner astronauts prep for ISS docking amid helium leak

It’s docking day for Boeing’s first Starliner astronaut mission with the spacecraft due to arrive at the International Space Station at 12:15 p.m. EDT (1615 GMT) with NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Sunita Williams aboard. 

The astronauts awoke from their first night in space at 4:30 a.m. EDT (0830 GMT), with Wilmore asking Mission Control for a status on two new helium leaks detected overnight in Starliner’s propulsion system.

“We’re kind of curious where we stand as far as our leaks. And if we could get a summary on that, that’d be wonderful,” Wilmore radioed to the Mission Control 

“The big picture that it currently creates is that are we are going to be able to support a rendezvous today,” Mission Control’s Capcom radioed back. 

Flight controllers detected two additional helium leaks to one already known about in Starliner’s propulsion system overnight and closed manifolds associated with them. Mission Control reports that all three manifolds should be reopened in time for docking. 

2024-06-05T18:21:31.171Z

NASA astronauts begin Starliner tests

This NASA map shows the position of the Starliner Crew Flight Test spacecraft en route to the International Space Station after launch on June 5, 2024. (Image credit: NASA TV)

NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Sunita Williams are hard at work performing initial tests on the Starliner spacecraft in orbit as they head to the International Space Station. 

Butch Wilmore is performing a series of manual flight control tests to see how Starliner handles under astronaut control. Boeing and NASA have about 85 different demonstrations and test to perform over the course of their one-week flight. 

“It’s really a big checkout day,” Steve Stich, NASA’s Commercial Crew Program manager, said in a statement. “And really ,the purpose of this is to learn we can about Starliner.”  

NASA chief Bill Nelson told reporters that Wilmore and Williams will test Starliner “from izzard to gizzard” during their mission. Space.com Spaceflight editor has the full story in our Starliner post-launch wrap up.

2024-06-05T17:00:23.692Z

Track Boeing’s Starliner mission online

NASA is holding a live press conference now about Boeing’s Starliner astronaut mission. You can watch it live on NASA TV here

Also, NASA’s Media Channel is showing a live mission coverage of Starliner’s progress to the International Space Station. You can follow that live here.

2024-06-05T15:31:36.665Z

Starliner in orbit!

Starliner has completed its orbital insertion burn, placing the spacecraft in a stable low-Earth orbit (LEO). Aboard, NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams are now on a coarse to rendezvous with the International Space Station (ISS), pending minor trajectory burns. Starliner is scheduled to dock with the ISS on Thursday (June 6) around 12:15 p.m. EDT (1615 GMT). 

2024-06-05T15:12:22.332Z

Spacecraft Separation! Starliner in Space

The Starliner spacecraft has successfully separated from the Centaur upper stage o its Atlas V rocket, a critical milestone for this Crew Flight Test mission. 

The spacecraft is technically not in orbit yet. That milestone will come after an orbital insertion burn scheduled for about 30 minutes after liftoff, or about 11:22 a.m. ET 

2024-06-05T15:01:13.364Z

Starliner Atlas V stage separation

ULA’s Atlas V rocket has jettisoned its first stage and is now flying under the power of two Centaur upper stage engines as it continues toward orbit.

The protective aeroskirt and docking port cover on the Starliner spacecraft have also been jettisoned. The rocket continues to perform as planned on the trip to space.

Here’s more photos of the launch.

Starliner launch June 5, 2024.

(Image credit: NASA TV)

(Image credit: NASA TV)

a rocket booster flies away from a rocket core stage, with earth visible below

(Image credit: NASA TV)
2024-06-05T14:57:05.369Z

Starliner Atlas V SRB separation

The Atlas V rocket carrying Boeing’s first crewed Starliner spacecraft to orbit has jettisoned its twin solid rocket boosters as the rocket continues its uphill flight toward orbit.

Coming up next is main engine shutdown and first stage separation. 

2024-06-05T14:53:11.985Z

LIFTOFF! Boeing Starliner launches 1st astronauts

STARLINER AWAY! Boeing’s first Starliner spacecraft to carry astronauts has lifted off atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket and is headed to space. 

Liftoff occurred on time at 10:52 a.m. EDT (1452 GMT). 

2024-06-05T14:49:18.603Z

Starliner GO for launch!

The Launch Director for today’s Boeing Starliner astronaut launch has conducted final GO-NO GO poll for today’s launch and it is GO across the board. Starliner is again ready for launch. Just minutes remain before launch.

“Starliner, Go,” Crew Flight Test commander Butch Wilmore said from inside the capsule during the test.

“We all know that when the going gets tough, as it often does, the tough get going, and you all have,” Wilmore said. “Let’s get going, let’s put some fire in this rocket. “

“Let’s go Calyspo, take us to space and back,” pilot Sunita Williams said, referring to the name of the Starliner capsule. 

2024-06-05T14:45:27.527Z

Starliner Crew Access Arm retracted, Starliner on internal power

(Image credit: NASA TV)

The Crew Access Arm has been retracted clear of the United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket as the countdown progresses for today’s Starliner astronaut launch at 10:52 a.m. EDT (1452 GMT). 

Starliner is now on internal power for the mission. So far, no issues have affected the launch countdown.

2024-06-05T14:41:42.922Z

Can you see Starliner’s launch on Atlas V?

Boeing’s 1st Starliner launch is now just over 10 minutes away. If you’re along the U.S. souteastern coast of Florida’s East Coast, you may be able to see the launch. 

Here’s a map of visibility for the Starliner Crew Flight Test launch atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. 

(Image credit: NASA TV)
2024-06-05T14:26:33.289Z

30 minutes to Starliner astronaut launch

NASA, Boeing and United Launch Alliance are now less than 30 minutes to Boeing’s first Starliner astronaut launch and all systems continue to perform well for today’s launch at 10:52 a.m. EDT (1452 GMT). 

In Houston, NASA’s Crew Flight Test director Mike Lamers is preparing to call for a Go-No Go poll to ensure Mission Control is ready for the flight. In Florida, ULA and Boeing’s launch director are preparing for their own final poll in the remaining minutes before launch.

2024-06-05T13:53:53.213Z

One hour to Starliner astronaut Launch

Boeing is now T-1 hour away and counting toward the launch of its first Starliner astronaut test flight for NASA at 10:52 am. EDT (1452 GMT). 

The countdown has been smooth so far, with the weather continuing to look good for launch. 

NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Sunita Williams will spend 25 hours aboard Starliner after launch to reach the International Space Station. Once at the ISS, they’ll spend about a week docked at the station performing tests on the spacecraft before returning to Earth for a land landing in the American Southwest. Check out this mission overview below.

2024-06-05T13:24:55.090Z

Starliner hatch closed for launch

A Starliner spacecraft and Atlas V rocket stand atop the launch pad ahead of the Crewed Flight Test launch on June 5, 2024

(Image credit: NASA TV)

The hatch to Boeing’s Starliner Crewed Flight Test capsule has been closed for launch as the countdown continues for Boeing’s historic first astronaut launch for NASA at 10:52 a.m. EDT (1452 GMT). 

Cabin pressurization is under way. 

2024-06-05T12:55:56.436Z

Starliner astronauts settle into capsule

(Image credit: NASA TV)

Boeing’s Starliner close-out crew has fully strapped in NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Sunita Williams for today’s launch at 10:52 a.m. EDT (1452 GMT) from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. 

A weather briefing is under way ahead of hatch closure for the Starliner spacecraft. So far, weather has looked promising, with a pristine 90% chance of good conditions to launch.

2024-06-05T12:10:39.473Z

Starliner astronauts board capsule

(Image credit: NASA TV)

Boeing’s Starliner close-out crew is strapping NASA astronaut Butch Wilmore into the  commander’s seat of the Starliner Crew Flight Test capsule as the countdown continues for today’s 10:52 a.m. EDT (1452 GMT) launch. Pilot Sunita Williams will follow Wilmore into the capsule from the White Room connected to the Starliner hatch shortly.

2024-06-05T11:36:59.729Z

Starliner astronauts head to launch pad

(Image credit: NASA TV)

Starliner Crewed Flight Test astronauts Butch Wilmore and Sunita Williams are headed to their Starliner Atlas V rocket launch pad at the Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. The two astronauts walked out of NASA’s Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building at the Kennedy Space Center with broad smiles, waves and roses as they bid farewell to friends and loved ones ahead of their flight. 

Before leaving for the pad, Wilmore (Starliner’s commander) and Williams (the pilot) did battle with NASA Chief Astronaut Joe Acaba (a teacher-turned-spaceflyer) in a series of games. By tradition, astronaut crews have to beat the chief astronaut at those games before leaving for the pad. They appeared to tackle trials of arm wrestling and Rock, Paper, Scissors for this go around. 

Starliner’s CFT mission will be the third career spaceflight for both Williams and Wilmore.

(Image credit: NASA TV)

(Image credit: NASA TV)
2024-06-05T10:55:37.463Z

Starliner astronauts suit up for launch, rocket fueled

(Image credit: NASA TV)

NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Sunita Williams are suiting up for their launch on Boeing’s Starliner Crewed Flight Test mission today from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida at 10:52 a.m. EDT (1452 GMT). Wilmore (commander) and Williams (pilot) are donning their blue Boeing-issue spacesuits in NASA’s checkout buidling. 

Meanwhile, United Launch Alliance has completed the fueling operations for the Starliner crew’s Atlas V rocket. Currently, all systems are operating as expected with a 90% chance of good weather, with cumulus clouds posing the only potential threat to launch. 

2024-06-05T09:26:57.696Z

Fueling has begun!

The ULA team has begun filing the Centaur upper stage with liquid oxygen. About 4,150 gallons of liquid oxygen will be loaded into the Dual Engine Centaur for its mission to accelerate Starliner to space. 

Starliner is scheduled to launch today at 10:52 a.m. EDT (1452 GMT). You can watch it here at Space.com, courtesy of NASA.

2024-06-04T17:11:50.195Z

Starliner go for launch on June 5

A Boeing CST-100 Starliner spacecraft is seen aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket on the launch pad at Space Launch Complex 41 ahead of NASA’s Boeing Crew Flight Test, Monday, June 3, 2024 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. (Image credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky)

The first crewed mission aboard the Boeing Starliner spacecraft is proceeding towards launch on Wednesday (June 5) after a computer issue in the ground launch sequencer system scrubbed the previous launch attempt with just minutes left in the countdown.

“Teams at NASA and Boeing Space confirmed on Monday that the Starliner spacecraft, ULA  Atlas V rocket, and ground support equipment are healthy and ready for the 10:52 a.m. ET June 5 launch of the agency’s Boeing Crew Flight Test,” NASA’s Commercial Crew program wrote on X on Monday (June 3). 

The U.S. Space Force’s Space Launch Delta 45 has predicted a 90% chance of favorable weather at launch, which occurs at 10:52 a.m. ET (1452 GMT). Watch it live here courtesy of NASA.

Related: Boeing’s 1st Starliner astronaut launch aborted minutes before liftoff (video)

2024-06-01T21:58:32.854Z

NASA says Starliner launch delayed to June 5

Boeing’s next attempt to launch its first Starliner astronaut mission will occur no earlier than June 5, NASA officials said this afternoon. 

In an emailed statement to reporters, NASA said that the agency, Boeing and the United Launch Alliance will skip a launch opportunity on June 2 and await the next window on June 5. Liftoff is now set for Wednesday, June 5, at 10:52 a.m. EDT (1452 GMT)

“Saturday’s launch was to carry NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams to and from the International Space Station scrubbed due to an observation of a ground launch sequencer. The system was unsuccessful in verifying the sequencer’s necessary redundancy,” NASA officials wrote in an update.

“NASA, Boeing, and ULA (United Launch Alliance) are forgoing a Crew Flight Test launch attempt Sunday, June 2, to give the team additional time to assess a ground support equipment issue at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station’s Space Launch Complex-41 in Florida,” NASA added. “ULA will assess the ground support equipment overnight, and NASA will provide an update June 2 on next steps for the flight. The next available launch opportunities are Wednesday, June 5, and Thursday, June 6.”

2024-06-01T19:50:02.635Z

Faulty computer card suspected in Starliner abort

Tory Bruno, CEO of the United Launch Alliance, told reporters that a faulty computer card appears to have led to today’s Starliner launch abort minutes before liftoff. The card is in one of several computers that form the ground launch sequencer system that governs the final phase of its Atlas V rocket countdown. Solving the problem may be as simple as just replacing the computer card, which can be done once pad crews can safely approach the pad after the Atlas V has been emptied of propellant and made safe, a process that will take several hours. 

If the fix is that simple, then Starliner’s next launch will be set for Sunday, July 2, at 12:03 p.m. EDT (1603 GMT), with NASA’s livestream of the launch beginning around 8 a.m. EDT (1200 GMT). NASA’s Steve Stitch said the agency will make an announcement later Saturday afternoon or evening on the launch plan. 

Meanwhile, the team is working hard despite the setback of a launch abort today, Stitch added.

“It’s disappointing. Everybody’s a little disappointed but you kind of roll your sleeves up and get right back to work.”

2024-06-01T17:46:26.936Z

Starliner astronauts egress spacecraft after scrub

a big van with a picture of a spaceship on the side.

Boeing’s astrovan transports NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams after a June 1 CFT launch scrub. (Image credit: Space.com / Josh Dinner)

Following today’s scrub of Boeing’s first crewed Starliner launch, NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams have now exited their spacecraft. After safing the launch vehicle and ground infrastructure, mission operators configured the launch tower at LC-41 to reopen Starliner’s hatch and assist the astronauts’ egress from the space capsule. They have now been transported back to their quarters at the Kennedy Space Center’s Neil A. Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building, remaining in quarantine as they await Starliner’s next launch attempt.

Related: Launch of Boeing’s 1st Starliner astronaut test flight aborted minutes before liftoff (video)

2024-06-01T16:35:56.918Z

SCRUB! Starliner launch attempt called off

United Launch Alliance has called an official scrub while engineers work to understand why a Ground Launch Sequencer called an automatic hold 3 minutes and 50 seconds before liftoff. 

There will be no Starliner launch today.

Boeing and ULA may attempt another launch try on Sunday, June 2, if they can clear the issue in time. 

2024-06-01T16:31:59.329Z

Starliner back on external power after launch hold

(Image credit: NASA)

Starliner CFT launch control reports that the Starliner spacecraft is back on external power while the countdown is halted at T-3 minutes, 50 seconds. 

The Crew Access Arm has been swiveled back to the Starliner capsule. 

If Starliner is unable to launch today, Boeing does have a backup day on Sunday, June 2, at 12:03 p.m. EDT (1603 GMT) if ULA and Boeing are able to clear the issue in time. 

2024-06-01T16:26:04.765Z

HOLD! Starliner launch countdown halted

Starliner’s launch director has called a hold at the T-3 minutes, 50 seconds mark, likely scrubbing today’s launch attempt due to its instantaneous window. 

We’re awaiting word on the exact nature of the hold, although audio from Launch Control did state that a launch control switch was not ready. Awaiting details

2024-06-01T16:18:07.314Z

Starliner Access Arm retracted, suit fan glitch fixed

Boeing's Starliner Crew Flight Test capsule on the launch pad atop an Atlas V rocket

(Image credit: NASA TV)

The Starliner Crew Access Arm has been moved clear of the Starliner capsule. Meanwhile, the flight control team appears to have cleared the spacesuit fan glitch and CFT astronauts Butch Wilmore and Sunita Williams have closed their visors for launch once more. 

2024-06-01T16:15:31.716Z

ULA, Boeing work through Starliner suit fan glitch

Starliner CFT commander Butch Wilmore has reported a suit fan warning light and launch controllers are now working to swap suit fan systems to a backup, with the crew told to open their helmet visors, even as they are less than 11 minutes to launch. 

Starliner CFT astronauts close helmets for launch

(Image credit: NASA TV)

Starliner CFT astronauts Butch Wilmore and Sunita Williams have closed their Boeing spacesuit helmets for launch as they entire their final 20 minutes before liftoff. 

United Launch Alliance flight controllers reported an errant temperature sensor reading in a sensor that won’t be needed for launch, so it’s been deactivated a bit earlier than planned and poses no issue for liftoff. The launch remains on track for 12:25 pm ET (1625 GMT). 

2024-06-01T15:52:30.672Z

Boeing Starliner hatch closed, access arm cleared

  (Image credit: NASA TV)

The closeout crew for Boeing’s first crewed Starliner launch on an Atlas V rocket is leaving the launch pad after closing the Starliner hatch and moving its Crew Access Arm clear of the capsule. 

Starliner and its Atlas V rocket sit atop Space Launch Complex-41 at the Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida with liftoff still targeted for 12:25 p.m. EDT. We are just over 30 minutes away from launch, with the weather forecast to be 90% GO at launch time.

2024-06-01T15:05:21.944Z

Valve issue circumvented

Propellant topping has resumed for the liquid oxygen and hydrogen tanks inside the Atlas Centaur upper stage. After testing a fix, engineers determined the issue was with the primary telemetry stream, not the valves themselves, and decided to switch the valve data stream to a redundant system. Now, as the countdown clock continues, mission operators are working to close the Starliner hatch ahead of launch.

2024-06-01T14:51:55.218Z

Valve issues with the Atlas Centaur upper stage

Two valves associated with propellant loading ground support systems, responsible in part for topping off propellant in the liquid oxygen and hydrogen tanks in the Atlas Centaur second stage, are experiencing an apparent communications issue between with launch control, causing mission operators to begin assessment for a corrective action. With two hours before liftoff, the decision was made to cease topping off the tanks in the rocket’s second stage as the problem is worked out. Mission operators are testing a redundancy system in order to circumvent the problem. 

Today’s launch is scheduled for an instantaneous liftoff window at 12:25 p.m. EDT (1625 GMT). Should the valve problem persist to the point that window becomes unviable, backup attempts are scheduled for tomorrow, June 5 and June 6.

2024-06-01T13:40:55.398Z

Starliner crew strapped in and ready to launch

Butch Wilmore strapped in to the Starliner spacecraft ahead of launching the CFT mission to the ISS> (Image credit: NASA)

Now less than three hours before liftoff, NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams are strapped into Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft ahead of the scheduled launch for the Crewed Flight Test (CFT) mission to the International Space Station (ISS). The pair will continue their prelaunch checklist before the hatch to Starliner will be shut and sealed as the countdown to liftoff ticks away. 

2024-06-01T13:11:21.786Z

Starliner astronauts headed to the launchpad

Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams in front of the Neil A. Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, in Florida. (Image credit: NASA)

NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams depart the Neil A. Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, in Florida, where the duo performed suit leak checks ahead of this afternoon’s crewed Starliner launch. They will make the short drive to United Launch Alliance’s (ULA) Launch Copmlex-41(LC-41) to board Starliner ahead of the12:25 p.m. EDT (1625 GMT) instantaneous launch window. The trip to orbit will take approximately 31 minutes, with Starliner’s service module executing the spacecraft’s final orbital insertion burn. NASA is livestreaming today’s launch activities, which you can watch here, at Space.com

2024-06-01T12:25:31.137Z

Fueling is underway ahead of Starliner’s first crewed launch

Starliner rests atop ULA’s Atlas V rocket at Space Launch Complex-41, May 31, 2024. (Image credit: Space.com / Josh Dinner)

Fueling is nearly complete for the Atlas V rocket poised to launch the first crewed mission of Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft. Atlas V’s engines are powered with 48,800 gallons (184,730 liters) of super-chilled liquid oxygen and RP-1 kerosene, and 12,300 gallons (46,560 liters) of liquid hydrogen for the Dual Engine Centaur upper stage.

Astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams will soon depart the Neil A. Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, in Florida, and make the short drive to LC-41 to board Starliner ahead of this afternoon’s 12:25 p.m. EDT (1625 GMT) liftoff.

Related: The ISS has a urine pump problem. Boeing’s Starliner astronaut launch will flush it out.

2024-05-31T16:50:07.785Z

Weather looks 90% favorable for 1st Starliner launch on June 1

Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft sits atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket at Space Launch Complex 41 on May 31, 2024, in Cape Canaveral, Florida.  (Image credit: Getty Images)

According to the most recent forecast on May 31, there is still a 90% chance of favorable weather for the first Crew Flight Test of Boeing’s new Starliner spacecraft.

Starliner will liftoff atop an Atlas V rocket from ULA’s Launch Complex-41, at the Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. NASA astronauts Barry Wilmore and Suni Williams will ride Starliner to the International Space Station.

“High pressure dominates the Central Florida weather, bringing breezy, easterly winds and dry, stable air to the Cape Canaveral Space Force Station for the launch opportunity,” United Launch Alliance (ULA) wrote on its website on Friday (May 31).

Launch is scheduled for this Saturday, June 1, at 12:25 p.m. EDT (1625 GMT). Watch it live here courtesy of ULA.

Related: Boeing’s Starliner rolls out to pad for June 1 astronaut launch (photos)

2024-05-28T21:52:24.932Z

Boeing and ULA on track for June 1 launch for NASA

Boeing and ULA are moving progressing toward a June 1 launch of the first crewed flight test (CFT) of the Starliner spacecraft. Liftoff atop an Atlas V rocket, from ULA’s Launch Complex-41, at the Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida, is scheduled for this Saturday, at 12:25 p.m. EDT (1625 GMT). According to a May 28 update from Boeing and ULA, Saturday’s forecast currently  shows a 90 percent chance of favorable weather conditions Starliner’s upcoming launch window.

2024-05-24T14:57:00.433Z

NASA, Boeing provide update on June 1 Starliner launch target

NASA and Boeing are providing an update to reporters at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 GMT) about the new target launch date of June 1 for Starliner, along with information on how fixes are proceeding on the spacecraft. You can tune in live on our website, and keep following for updates on the situation.

2024-05-14T16:23:24.799Z

Boeing Starliner crew flight test delayed to May 21

We’ll have to wait a little longer for the first crew flight test of Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft.

After the first launch attempt on May 8 was scrubbed due to a valve issue on the United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket that will launch Starliner, Boeing announced today that teams are now “targeting a launch date of no earlier than 4:43 p.m. EDT (2043 GMT) on Tuesday, May 21, to complete additional testing.”

When it launches, Starliner will carry NASA astronauts Barry “Butch” Wilmore and Sunita “Suni” Williams to the International Space Station for a seven-day test flight. You can watch the launch live here when the time comes.

Related: Boeing’s Starliner rolled off launch pad to replace ‘buzzing’ rocket valve (photo)

2024-05-14T15:59:09.526Z

1st astronaut launch of Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft just 3 days away

United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket with Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner spacecraft aboard is seen on the launch pad illuminated by spotlights at Space Launch Complex 41 ahead of NASA’s Boeing Crew Flight Test, Sunday, May 5, 2024 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. (Image credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky)

The first crewed launch of Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft is just three days away, if current timelines hold.

Starliner’s first launch attempt on May 6 was delayed due to a valve issue on its rocket ride. United Launch Alliance rolled its Atlas V rocket back to an assembly building at Cape Canaveral Space Force to replace the valve on May 8.

The next launch attempt is now scheduled for 6:16 p.m. EDT (2216 GMT) on Friday (May 17). You can watch the launch live here at Space.com.

Related: Boeing’s Starliner rolled off launch pad to replace ‘buzzing’ rocket valve (photo)

2024-05-07T23:54:49.408Z

Crewed Starliner launch delayed to no earlier than May 17, rocket rolling back for repairs

NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams will have to wait another 10 days for their launch to the International Space Station (ISS). United Launch Alliance (ULA) is moving forward with the replacement of a pressure regulation valve on the liquid oxygen tank in the Atlas V rocket’s Centaur upper stage, which caused a scrub of Monday night’s (May 6) Starliner launch. Monday’s attempt to launch Starliner’s crewed flight test (CFT) was called off about two ours before the scheduled liftoff, and initially retargeted a new launch date of May 10.

Now, ULA will roll Starliner and its Atlas V launch vehicle back to the company’s vertical integration facility tomorrow (May 8), where the second stage valve will be replaced, NASA announced in a blog post. The May 17 launch attempt is scheduled for an instantaneous launch window at 6:16 p.m. EDT (1016 GMT).

2024-05-07T06:08:22.485Z

Starliner’s first crewed launch delayed to no earlier than Friday (May 10)

It will take a few days to work through the valve issue that scrubbed the first astronaut mission of Boeing’s Starliner capsule, a test mission to the International Space Station called Crew Flight Test (CFT).

CFT was supposed to launch on Monday night (May 6). That attempt was called off about two hours before the planned liftoff, however, due to an issue with a pressure regulation valve on the liquid oxygen tank in the upper stage of Starliner’s rocket ride, a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V. Early on Tuesday morning (May 7), NASA announced that launch teams need more time to troubleshoot the issue. The earliest that CFT could launch is now Friday night (May 10), at 9 p.m. EDT (0100 GMT on May 11). 

2024-05-07T03:20:02.361Z

ULA eyes ‘buzzing’ valve swap for 2nd Starliner launch try

Untied Launch Alliance CEO Tory Bruno told reporters late Monday that ULA engineers are studying a “buzzing” liquid oxygen pressure relief valve on the Atlas V rocket’s Centaur upper stage to determine if it needs to be replaced — a finding that will determine when the next launch try of Boeing’s 1st Starliner astronaut mission could fly.

During tonight’s scrubbed launch, ULA engineers detected that the valve was “buzzing” – rapidly opening and closing repeatedly – and ultimately called off the launch. While ULA has seen the valve issue on previous uncrewed satellite launches, the flight rules for Starliner’s crewed test forbid cycling the valve to fix it with astronauts aboard. 

If the wonky valve needs to be replaced, the earliest Starliner could launch its Crew Flight Test mission would be Sunday, May 12, Bruno said. If not, the mission could potentially aim for Tuesday, May 7, at 10:11 p.m. ET or Friday, May 10, at 9 pm ET. 

Engineers are expected to know more on the road ahead for Starliner and the Atlas V early Tuesday.

2024-05-07T02:31:39.153Z

NASA briefing on Starliner launch scrub

NASA will hold a press conference on tonight’s Boeing Starliner astronaut launch scrub at 10:30 p.m. EDT (0230 May 7 GMT). You’ll be able to watch it live at the top of this page at start time. 

“NASA, Boeing, and United Launch Alliance will host a news conference at 10:30 p.m. EDT to discuss Monday’s scrubbed launch attempt of the agency’s Crew Flight Test due to a faulty oxygen relief valve observation on the United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket Centaur second stage,” NASA officials wrote in an update. “NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams exited the Starliner spacecraft at Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida and returned to astronaut crew quarters.”

2024-05-07T01:17:23.446Z

Boeing Starliner scrubbed due to rocket valve issue

Boeing’s new commercial spacecraft, Starliner, waved off its first launch attempt late tonight (May 6) due to a problem with an “oxygen relief valve on the Centaur Stage on the Atlas V,” NASA posted on X. Atlas V, the flight’s rocket manufactured by United Launch Alliance, has flown missions since 2002 with a 100 percent success rate, but this is its first mission with astronauts.

“The engineering team has evaluated the vehicle is not in a configuration where we can proceed with flight today,” an official in Mission Control said in a callout broadcast on NASA Television roughly two hours and one minute before the scheduled launch at 10:34 p.m. EDT (0024 GMT May 7).

Read more: Boeing Starliner team delays 1st historic astronaut launch due to rocket issue

2024-05-07T00:36:10.149Z

Launch scrubbed

Crew Flight Test is scrubbed for tonight, United Launch Alliance announced on its Twitter feed.

“ULA Launch Director Tom Heter III has made the decision to the launch team that launch operations will not continue tonight for #AtlasV and #Starliner.”

More information to come.

2024-05-06T23:45:26.033Z

Crew Flight Test astronauts enter spacecraft

NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams, of Crew Flight Test, have started ingress of their Boeing Starliner spacecraft. Launch is scheduled for 10:34 p.m. EDT (0234 GMT May 7) and is set to be the first Starliner mission with astronauts on board.

2024-05-06T23:10:16.665Z

Crew Flight Test astronauts finish walkout

Crew Flight Test NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams are now out of their quarantine facility, fully ready in their spacesuits, and doing crew walkout. They will soon be on their way to the launch pad shortly via the Airstream Astrovan II for their ride to Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station.

Launch of the first Boeing Starliner mission with astronauts is scheduled for tonight (May 6) at 10:34 p.m. EDT (0234 GMT Tuesday, May 7) from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station.

2024-05-06T22:58:28.096Z

Crew Flight Test astronauts walk out to Astrovan II

Crew Flight Test astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams, both of NASA and both  former U.S. Navy test pilots, are about to do their walk out to the Airstream Astrovan II for their ride to Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station. 

Launch of the first Boeing Starliner mission with astronauts is scheduled for tonight (May 6) at 10:34 p.m. EDT (0234 GMT Tuesday, May 7) from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station.

2024-05-06T22:30:22.059Z

NASA Television coverage begins

NASA’s coverage of Boeing Starliner is live! You can follow all updates via our home page at Space.com. Launch is scheduled for 10:34 p.m. EDT (0234 GMT May 7). 

This mission, known as Crew Flight Test, aims to be the first to send astronauts to the International Space Station. On board are NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams.

2024-05-06T18:18:02.563Z

Where will Boeing’s Starliner launch will be visible from?

United Launch Alliance (ULA) released this map showing the locations from where tonight’s (May 6) launch of Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft atop a ULA Atlas V rocket will be visible. (Image credit: ULA)

Even if you can’t make it out to Florida’s space coast to see the first astronaut launch of Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft, you might be able to catch a glimpse of the rocket in flight.

United Launch Alliance (ULA), whose mighty Atlas V rocket will launch NASA astronauts Suni Williams and Butch Wilmore on the first crew flight test of Boeing’s new Starliner spacecraft, released a visibility map on X showing the locations in Florida from where the launch might be visible.

ULA’s Atlas V rocket is scheduled to lift off on Monday (May 6) at 10:34 p.m. (0234 GMT on May 7) from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station. Watch it live here courtesy of NASA starting at 6:30 p.m. EDT (2230 GMT).

Related: How to watch Boeing’s 1st Starliner astronaut launch tonight live online
Read more: Boeing Starliner 1st astronaut flight: Live updates

2024-05-06T11:36:01.257Z

Starliner launch on track for tonight

The long awaited liftoff of Boeing’s Starliner will launch this evening (May 6), carrying NASA astronauts Barry “Butch” Willmore and Sunita “Sunni” Williams, on the spacecraft’s first crewed flight.

Liftoff for Starliner’s crewed flight test (CFT) is set for an instantaneous launch window at 10:34 p.m. EDT (0234 GMT on Tuesday, May 7), from Launch Complex-41 (LC-41), at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, in Florida. The spacecraft will launch on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket, and will rendezvous with the International Space Station (ISS) May 8, at 12:48 a.m. EDT (0648 GMT).

The mission, designed as a final shake-down cruise for Starliner, will remain docked with the ISS for about 10 days while Wilmore and Williams test the spacecraft’s systems, before returning to Earth.

You can watch the historic mission from launch, ISS rendezvous, and return live here at Space.com, courtesy of NASA Television.

2024-05-05T12:54:15.529Z

1 day until historic Boeing Starliner launch with astronauts

Launch day for the debut Boeing Starliner spacecraft is scheduled to be no earlier than tomorrow (May 6). The instantaneous launch window opens at 10:34 p.m. EDT (0234 GMT on Tuesday, May 7) and you can watch the historic International Space Station (ISS) mission live here at Space.com, courtesy of NASA Television.

An Atlas V rocket rolled out to its launch pad on Saturday (May 4), also Star Wars Day, at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station. The stack includes both the United Launch Alliance booster and Starliner.

The mission, called Crew Flight Test (CFT), will send two veteran NASA astronauts and former U.S. Navy test pilots aloft: Butch Wilmore will command the mission and Suni Williams will be the pilot. The duo are quarantining at the nearby Kennedy Space Center.

Read more: Boeing Starliner rolls out to launch pad for 1st astronaut flight on May 6 (photos)

2024-05-04T13:36:57.011Z

What’s next for Boeing Starliner after 1st crew flight test?

Boeing Starliner makes an uncrewed approach to the International Space Station during its second test flight, on May 20, 2022. (Image credit: NASA)

The first crew flight test of Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft is just days away.

After years of development, NASA and Boeing are set to introduce another option for accessing low Earth orbit with Starliner. But what exactly will the Starliner program look like after the crew flight test on May 6?

Read our full coverage where we break down what’s next for Starliner, including its first operational mission to the International Space Station in 2025.

Related: What’s next for Boeing Starliner after its 1st crew flight test?
Read more: Their other vehicle is the Starliner: Boeing’s 1st crew to ride Astrovan II to the launch pad

2024-05-03T14:30:25.125Z

Boeing Starliner was delayed years. Here’s why

The Boeing Starliner capsule that will fly the company’s Crew Flight Test mission to the International Space Station is shown at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida in April 2023. (Image credit: Boeing/John Grant)

Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft is finally on the verge of making its first crewed flight. 

Starliner has had a hard road to get rated for crewed flight, including years of delays and an unsuccessful first uncrewed flight test in 2019 in which the spacecraft did not reach the ISS as planned.

So how did Starliner get here, despite its numerous setbacks? Read our full coverage to get up to speed with what makes Starliner’s Crew Flight Test mission currently scheduled for Monday (May 6) at 10:34 p.m. EDT (0234 GMT on May 7) such a historic moment.

Related: Boeing’s Starliner is ready to fly astronauts after years of delay. Here’s what took so long.

2024-05-02T15:41:19.382Z

What to expect during Boeing Starliner’s May 6 astronaut flight

Boeing’s Starliner makes its first uncrewed approach to the International Space Station during Orbital Flight Test-2 on May 21, 2022. (Image credit: NASA)

After years of delays, it’s finally here: The first crewed flight test of Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft.

Starliner is scheduled to launch from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida on May 16 at 10:34 p.m. EDT (0234 GMT May 7). The event will be livestreamed here at Space.com, via NASA Television.

But what exactly will happen before, during and after the launch? Space.com’s Elizabeth Howell, who will be on location for Starliner’s first astronaut launch, breaks down the key milestones in terms of what to expect during Boeing Starliner’s test flight on May 6.

Related: Here’s what to expect during Boeing Starliner’s 1st astronaut test flight on May 6

2024-05-01T12:25:17.559Z

Starliner astronauts hold last press conference before May 6 launch

The first two NASA astronauts to fly aboard Boeing Starliner, Barry “Butch” Wilmore and pilot Suni Williams, will have a press conference with reporters from their quarantine at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center (KSC) near Orlando, Florida. 

The virtual news conference will run live on NASA Television at 1:30 p.m. EDT (1730 GMT) and will be streamed here at Space.com if possible.

The astronauts’ mission, Crew Flight Test or CFT, will also see Wilmore and Williams (both former U.S. Navy test pilots) become the first humans to fly on board the United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket. Launch is scheduled for May 6 at 10:34 p.m. EDT (0234 GMT May 7).

CFT is expected to last a bit over a week and will include a stay at the International Space Station (ISS). Alongside ground controllers, Williams and Wilmore will perform a check of all major spacecraft systems ahead of certifying Starliner for six-month excursions to space.

Boeing will then join SpaceX as a provider of astronaut spacecraft for ISS missions. Read more about why NASA wants two companies sending astronauts to space in this Space.com story.

2024-04-30T15:28:29.169Z

Starliner launch schedule released for May 6 launch

NASA has released its launch schedule for Boeing Starliner‘s historic first flight with astronauts, which will take place no earlier than Monday (May 6) at 10:34 p.m. EDT. 

NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams, both former U.S. Navy test pilots, will fly their mission to the International Space Station for approximately a week to certify Starliner for future half-year missions. They will also be the first astronauts to ride aboard United Launch Alliance (ULA)’s Atlas V rocket. Liftoff will take place from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center near Orlando, Florida.

Coverage will run live here at Space.com, via NASA Television. All major events for Starliner’s flight are listed below. Timings for events below are in EDT.

Wednesday, May 1

1:30 p.m. – Virtual news conference at Kennedy with the flight test astronauts:

Friday, May 3
12:30 p.m. – Prelaunch news conference at Kennedy (no earlier than one hour after completion of the Launch Readiness Review) with the following participants:

3:30 p.m. – NASA Social panel live stream event at Kennedy with the following participants:

Monday, May 6

6:30 p.m. – Launch coverage begins.

10:34 p.m. – Launch.

Tuesday, May 7

12 a.m. – Postlaunch news conference with the following participants:

2024-04-29T18:19:09.955Z

Boeing Starliner astronauts 1 week away from launch

Butch Wilmore, commander for Crew Flight Test, outside the Boeing Starliner spacecraft during a dress rehearsal on April 26, 2024. The scorch mark on the side of the spacecraft is a harmless souvenir from re-entry during an uncrewed mission known as Orbital Flight Test, in 2019. (Image credit: Mike Fincke/NASA/X)

NASA astronauts Barry “Butch” Wilmore and pilot Suni Williams finished a big dress rehearsal for their Boeing Starliner mission on Friday (April 26) near their launch pad at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Their quarantined training continues for a scheduled May 6 liftoff to the International Space Station, one week from today.

Williams and Wilmore also recently performed a video tour of one of their simulators, called the Boeing Mission Trainer, to demonstrate procedures for launch and landing. The simulator is housed at NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston.

Their mission, Crew Flight Test, passed its latest flight readiness review on Thursday (April 25), although as with all launches, safety and weather checks will continue all the way through the time it lifts off. The mission is expected to last about a week to certify future half-year operational excursions, starting with Starliner-1 in 2025.

Read more: Boeing Starliner astronauts conduct dress rehearsal ahead of May 6 launch (photos, video)

2024-04-26T19:42:30.435Z

1st Starliner astronauts finish dress rehearsal before May 6 launch

NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams finished a big dress rehearsal before their historic launch upon Boeing Starliner no earlier than May 6, agency officials said Friday (April 26) hours after the rehearsal finished.

“Wilmore and Williams completed a series of launch day milestones including suiting up, working in a flight deck simulator, and operating the same software that will be used during the launch,” NASA officials wrote in a blog post on Friday (April 26).

The rehearsal took place at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Orlando, Florida and included a countdown procedure with the Starliner spacecraft, which is on top of the United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket that will carry it to the International Space Station (ISS).

The one-week Crew Flight Test passed its latest flight readiness review with NASA on Thursday (April 25). CFT, the first Starliner mission with astronauts, aims to certify the spacecraft for six-month missions to the ISS that may start as soon as 2025. Read more about Starliner being “go for launch” here at Space.com.

2024-04-25T18:01:46.682Z

Starliner astronauts arrive at launch site

Boeing Crew Flight Test astronauts Butch Wilmore (left) and Suni Williams, both of NASA, arrive at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida April 25 in a T-38 jet ahead of their launch. (Image credit: NASA)

The two NASA astronauts who will fly on Boeing’s first crewed Starliner spacecraft have arrived at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida to prepare for their historic launch to the International Space Station on June 1. 

Boeing Starliner Crew Flight Test commander Butch Wilmore and pilot Sunita Williams landed their NASA T-38 supersonic jet at the space center’s Launch and Landing Facility after a short flight from Houston’s Ellington Field near the Johnson Space Center. 

The astronauts will launch to the ISS on Boeing’s Starliner and an Atlas V rocket from Space Launch Complex 41 at the Cape Canaveral Space Force Station near KSC. Their  one-week mission to the ISS is a final shakedown cruise for Boeing’s Starliner to prove it is ready for operational NASA crew flights. At the end of the mission, Starliner will parachute to Earth and make a land-based landing in the southwestern United States.

This post was originally published on Space.com

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